Week In Review: 4/11-17

So, this is closer to how I perceived this blog going. This might occur weekly–short blurbs of interesting competitions from the previous week. Hopefully it’ll help me keep up with goings-on in cities I don’t tend to follow.

My editor helped out too.

4/11: Two perfecto-hurlers dueled in Illinois. Would it, too, be hitless? The White Sox were, until Rios’ single in the fourth. Their opponents were, too, until Kurt Suzuki’s single in the sixth. People were very excited, due to the one-hitter in progress, expressing their convictions: “2011 is the summer of the one-hitter! It’s got “ones” in it! Like zeroes in 2010, the summer of the no-hitter, you know?”

[This didn’t truly occur. -ed]

But the pitchers’ duel continued, still 1-0 into the ninth. Then, however, Pierre’s (the White Sox’ left fielder) error brought in the tying run. Suzuki would homer in the top of the tenth to win it, with poor Pierre grounding into the finishing out.

4/12: Ohio might rock–the Tribe sit in first in their division now–but they didn’t here. No, they lost 2-0, with Bourjos going deep solo (Trumbo, too). But were these homers the big surprise? Possibly to Trumbo, who hit his first. The true news story, though, involved the opposing pitcher, who…held the Tribe to one hit, Shin-Soo Choo’s fourth-inning single. Then there were lots of comments describing how this would…

[Nope, nope there still weren’t. -ed] Bleep it, you people jump to conclusions but then don’t jump to conclusions when it would be funny. Oh well.

4/13: Bonds found guilty of obstruction of justice. [Not defensive obstruction, which occurs when fielders illicitly impede the progress of runners. This is difficult to pull off from left field. -ed] Though, he stole lots, once. Possibly he could run in quickly enough. The point is, this didn’t occur here.

4/15: MLB honors Robinson. This seems to occur pretty well in to the spring. Not beginning in the common month helps. The new website, I’m 42, includes Tweets, pictures, videos, but no Deep Thought. [Well, discussing the end of the color line is deep thought, I suppose. -ed]

Quiet, you.

4/17: The Twins choose their new closer. Once more. Considering how much bullpen strength they got themselves the previous summer, this should not present problems for them. Wonder how much more they’ll wind up with before this summer finishes? It could be lots.

Non-lipogramatically, new sidebar link: Value Over Replacement Grit, some great baseball stuff (involving lots of wordplay!) from Humbug alum dianagram. Scrabble fans, check this out.

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Man on the Moon

REM and a wild dream, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Alvin Dark and a bitter team, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Spitballs and subterfuge, drama we crave, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Mister Fred Gladding racking up the saves, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Let’s play baseball, see the stars, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
See you in space if you get that far, yeah yeah yeah yeah.

Hey, Alvin did you hear about this one?
Tell me did you have a great hunch?
Alvin, are you goofing on Perry, hey
Are we losing touch?
If you believe they put a man on the moon (man on the moon…)
If you believe that this is gonna leave the yard, then we’re cool…

Gaylord went hitting with a staff of wood, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
The Mets started hitting and they got real good, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Seattle was troubled by a horrible start, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Mr. Ron Santo watched the Cubs fall apart, yeah yeah yeah yeah.

Hey, Alvin did you hear about this one?
Tell me did you have a great hunch?
Alvin, are you goofing on Perry, hey
Are we losing touch?
If you believe they put a man on the moon (man on the moon…)
If you believe that this is gonna leave the yard, then we’re cool…

Here’s a little ticket for the diehard fan, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Here’s a tiny footstep for a single man, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Here’s a home run flying out of the park, yeah yeah yeah yeah.
Here’s a prediction from Mr. Alvin Dark, yeah yeah yeah yeah.

Hey, Alvin did you hear about this one?
Tell me did you have a great hunch?
Alvin, are you goofing on Perry, hey
Are we losing touch?
If you believe they put a man on the moon (man on the moon…)
If you believe that this is gonna leave the yard, then we’re cool…
If you believe they put a man on the moon (man on the moon…)
If you believe that this is gonna leave the yard, then we’re cool…
If you believe they put a man on the moon (man on the moon…)
If you believe that this is gonna leave the yard, then we’re cool…

Alvin Dark once said that a man would walk on the moon before Gaylord Perry hit a major league home run.

He was right by seventeen minutes.

May 26, 2009

You probably wouldn’t think this was important, how this aligns chronologically. So what, if I’m writing this so many hours, days, months following a particular loss? Timing isn’t important, is it? Not as much as win or loss, anyway, though how much that’s important is unknown.

In a long-past nocturnal hallucination, I found a library book. A tiny thing, as if too small for its row. It was about you and your squad, with (I think) psychic ability having a thing or two to do with it. A typical hallucinatory twist. Typing out that story was my only opportunity to look at it. So I did.

It’s not around now. I got rid of it, I think, in humiliation (“My writing was that bad?”). It’s a common thought. (So why do I put my writing up on a public blog?)

Did anybody jinx you that night? I doubt it–that is to say, I doubt a jinx was at fault for your loss. You’d doubt it, wouldn’t you?

Last night, I was trying hard to find a Chicago broadcast with my radio. I thought of 2008, with its Chicago-Pittsburgh marathons. I didn’t want it to drag on, though. That matchup, Pittsburgh won.

I got to know its finish, but I couldn’t go unconscious following that. Not as quickly as I would want to. I want to say that I last saw my clock at 11:40: almost today, May 26. But was it 10:40? Who knows. If I had a hallucination, I forgot it.

Why am I writing a lipogram, of all things? For an “amount of difficulty bonus”? So I can think Oh, but could said prodigy do this? and not I wish I was that good?

Or, in doing a truly hard, uncommon task, do I push toward that which I cannot say?

Life, The Universe, & Everything

I’m too young to reflexively sigh upon seeing “4/15”. To be honest, it inspires me to smile; it’s been twenty-four months since my first-ever blog post went online. Life now is different from how things were in the spring of ’07: in some forms better, in some forms worse.

I come with, not some overwhelming question, but this simple inquiry. Does “retire” signify “to tire for the second (or third, or nth) time”? No, to be honest. Definitely not in the sense of putting new tires on one’s bike, or opening your trunk to dig out tire #5. If it did, “unretire” would be even more confusing. “To be restored for the nth time?” Renewed in energy, with the power of returning once more? Well, why not?

Retiring numbers is just one tiny bit of the bigger process of glorifying bygone legends. Nothing inherently wrong with this–I couldn’t come up with someone who deserves recognition more, nor do I desire to. This implies nothing of consequence, though.

Numbers drew me to this sport, series of them in the news. When you get down to it, though, selecting uniform numbers tends to be uneventful. Tributes to one’s idol or one’s hometown, but surely no jokes13. It’s not some set of true records, in the end, just one more process by which we identify the people on the field. For me, digits tend to be not so difficult to remember, if my only other choice is truly seeing someone else.

So by giving everyone this one number, is the intention to tell the world “everyone is meritorious, everyone is worthy, no ridiculous judgments here”? Or is it to tell us “everyone is one entity”? The intention, I suppose, is benign. But it’s not quite enough.

But questioning is good, if only since the other option–not questioning–is worse. So I’ll keep on questioning, protesting if I feel like it, & wondering. It’ll be enough, out of necessity if nothing else. I won’t find simplistic responses.

Or, I will find one, but I won’t know I’ve found it despite it being everywhere on the field, utterly impossible to miss.